Bruno Sacco, o pai do carrinho

Ver o tópico anterior Ver o tópico seguinte Ir em baixo

Bruno Sacco, o pai do carrinho

Mensagem por Laurival em Ter 30 Out 2007 - 12:14



[Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver esta imagem.]

Bruno Sacco
For 39 years, Mercedes-Benz's first styling czar has overseen design evolution at the world's oldest automaker.

Bruno Sacco, director of design for Mercedes-Benz, is this year's Honored Designer at Eyes on Classic Design. His is an extraordinary talent, and that talent has been applied for nearly 40 years to the products of an extraordinary automaker. When the history of Mercedes-Benz is written, a long chapter will be devoted to the contributions of Bruno Sacco.
Born in Udine, Italy, in 1933, Sacco traces his love for design to a spring afternoon in Tarvisio. It was 1951, and Sacco was on his bicycle headed for the tennis court. An electric blue 1950 Studebaker, a Commander Regal designed by Raymond Loewy, crossed his path. Sacco could not banish the image of this car from his consciousness, though he did not then and there shout, "I will be a great designer of automobiles."
Sacco's educational path took him to the Technical University of Turin, where he studied mechanical engineering. Following completion of his university studies, he unsuccessfully sought work at Ghia and Pinin Farina (now Pininfarina), two legends of Italian design.
His job seeking took him to Germany where he was hired as a stylist by Karl Wilfert at Daimler-Benz in 1958. A few years earlier, Wilfert had created the company's first dedicated styling department at Sindelfingen, a pleasant town near the company headquarters city of Stuttgart. Though he could hardly have imagined it at the time, Bruno Sacco would make the name Sindelfingen synonymous with styling excellence.
Thinking to stay only a few years, Sacco's plans were soon changed. In 1959, he married a girl from Berlin, Annemarie lbe, and in 1960, their daughter Marina was born. Meanwhile, the work at Mercedes-Benz grew more and more compelling.
Sacco worked on the massive limousine, the 600, the handsome 230SL, the Mercedes-Benz ESV (Experimental Safety Vehicle) and on the series of experimental cars collectively called the C111. One of the C111s will be on display at Eyes on Classic Design.
Soon, after becoming accustomed to the Mercedes-Benz way of doing things, Sacco began to make his own contributions to the corporate culture. In 1970, he was made manager of the bodywork and ergonomics departments. He describes his assimilation into the Mercedes-Benz culture thus:
"First, I had to understand it, which took several years. It was difficult for the Germans themselves. There weren't any written [styling or design] laws; it was a corporate culture. They had a working philosophy all their own, one that's well described in the motto coined by one of the founders, the engineer Gottlieb Daimler: 'Nothing but the best.' Once I understood it, I began to evolve the form."
In 1974, Sacco became chief engineer, and a year later, he became head of the Daimler-Benz styling center at Sindelfingen. He was head of passenger-car styling for the oldest automaker on the planet.
The evolution of Mercedes-Benz automobiles mirrors the progress of Sacco himself: the 1979 S class, the SEC coupe of 1981, the 190 series in 1982, the E class in 1984 (including the E class wagon in 1986 and the coupe in 1987), a new S class in 1991 (with its new coupe in 1992), the C class of 1993, and the recent flood of new models that include the M class sport-utility vehicle (called an all-activity vehicle at Mercedes-Benz), the SLK, CLK, and the SL 600.This last trio will be on display at Eyes on Classic Design.
Often overlooked in Sacco's own history is his time spent working with Bela Barenyi, one of the most famous--and reputable--designers and pioneers in the field of passive safety. Sacco, working with Barenyi, specialized in research projects applicable to innovative body design and calculation. Three generations of the C111 project car testify to his work with Barenyi.
Mercedes-Benz has always been conscious of its heritage. Regardless of how fresh and innovative, the shape of a new Mercedes is unmistakably allied with its predecessors. Key design elements survive, intelligently modified, from the previous generation; other elements join an evolution that has flowed through decades of progressive models. Unlike any other automaker in the world, Mercedes-Benz can trace any new design to the very first automobile: the earliest Daimler and Benz creations. This is a heavy responsibility, but Bruno Sacco has dealt with it.
"Evolution has always existed [at Mercedes-Benz]", says Sacco. "Until the Seventies, it was very slow. Then it picked up speed. People understood that it was the right path to take. Corporate elements can be identified even beyond the grille and the three-pointed star. And it isn't necessary to be a designer in order to recognize them. We showed photos of new models to non-Mercedes drivers. The first photos were blurred, then we showed clearer and clearer ones. Even with the first blurred photos, the majority recognized that the car, which they had never seen before, was a Mercedes."
Sacco's mention of the grille and the three-pointed star opens the way for an automotive parable that illustrates how individual features become identified first with a car and then with the company itself.
Until the model 180 (W-120) was introduced in 1953--the first modern Mercedes-Benz sedan--Mercedes-Benz cannot rightly be said to have demonstrated design continuity. Nevertheless, marque identity was carefully maintained throughout the model range and passed on from a retiring model to its replacement. A case in point is the subtle, nine- decade evolution of the three-pointed star carried on Mercedes-Benz cars. The trident--signifying land, sea, and air, each an area served by Daimler engines--moved from a position, in relief, on the radiator entablature to its present three-dimensional form in 1924, the year Daimler and Benz announced their merger. Benz contributed the ring that encircled the trident. The symbol has been there ever since.
Until 1953, the foundation this symbol stood on was a massive, chrome-plated radiator cap. Then, with the model 180, the radiator cap was moved under the hood, but the three-pointed star remained freestanding.
The other potent signature of every Mercedes-Benz automobile, its grille, possesses a similar evolutionary history. A tribute to the first modern car--the 1901 Daimler runabout--the grille is, in current form, the product of 96 years of gradual change. The grille was at first entirely utilitarian, its appearance inseparable from its working purpose, that of a functional radiator.
When a smaller, lighter radiator was incorporated beginning in the early 1930s, the grille became a nonfunctional styling ingredient. The original grillwork was retained as a kind of protective screen between the new radiator, fitted vertically just behind it, and whatever flying debris might damage its shell. The shape of this grille, this symbolic radiator has changed considerably in recent years, most dramatically by becoming much more horizontal.
Thus the evolution of Mercedes-Benz often reveals a complex interaction between aesthetic and practical considerations. A purely functional exploitation of the new radiator of the early 1930s, for instance, might have modified the grille, allowing a lower hoodline. But popular expectations of the time called for automobiles that possessed tall, narrow, lengthy engine compartments--particularly those cars meant to be emphatic statements of wealth and position.
Behind its instantly identifiable mock-radiator grille, Mercedes-Benz traveled for more than half a century without the benefit of a single-purpose design department, yet it remained consistent with its past, and indicative of its future. Until the early 1950s, Mercedes-Benz cars were not designed as the term is currently used--that is, given a distinctive shape that combines maximum function and maximum aesthetic appeal. They were essentially engineered--developed in the engineering department to its criteria.
Not that such a method deserves criticism, or inevitably leads to anything less than excellence. To the contrary, some of the most beautiful and most successful racing cars of all time--the Mercedes-Benz grand prix machines of the late 1920s to the mid-1950s--were not "styled" or even "designed," but were developed by the racing department to a few straightforward criteria of pure function: minimal weight with maximum engine output, aerodynamic efficiency, and psychological impact. Like other objects of great technological complexity and notable utility--the Space Shuttle or the Hasselblad 1600E single-lens reflex camera--these racing cars arrived at their exterior forms as a natural, logical development of rigorous engineering optimization--to the exclusion of virtually all decorative elements. In fact, the one concession to the visual appeal of the 1934 racing car, a coat of white paint, had to be removed before the season's first race in I order to meet the grand prix weight limit. Ironically, matte aluminum looked even more distinctive than white paint, and from then on was deemed official racing trim.
The Mercedes-Benz racing program has supplied the Mercedes-Benz passenger-car program with numerous advanced engineering solutions. Its vital emphasis on pure function has colored the personality of every Mercedes-Benz introduced in a major portion of the past century. Yet, in the early 1950s, the functional goals that had once dictated every element of Mercedes-Benz design began to merge with other more aesthetic concerns. This was not, however, a complete departure. Engineering goals remained the principal design consideration.
Here at last was a clear need for a design department. It may seem that the criterion of engineering function will dictate a single, optimal design solution. Nothing could be further from the truth. Typically, numerous functionally equivalent engineering solutions will emerge. It is at this point that the designer--part engineer, part marketer, part artist--must step in to select among aesthetically diverse choices.
With almost four decades at the Mercedes-Benz style center, Bruno Sacco is better able than most to assess the weight of marque tradition against the development of recent Mercedes-Benz automobiles, vehicles that represent management and marketing strategies that were unthinkable just a decade ago.
Bruno Sacco has define the readily perceived evolutionary changes in the Mercedes-Benz products emerging from Stuttgart (and from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where the M-class sport-utility vehicle is built) by coining a new expression of design philosophy: representativity. He uses the new CLK coupe as an example.
"The CLK was conceived in a different key from the 124 coupe which, in a certain sense, preceded it. The styling was intentionally oriented toward a certain lack of representativity. There's a lot of dignity in the car, but the absence of representational elements directs it toward a different, wider public-even at the cost of leaving some of our established customers somewhat puzzled," says Sacco.
"For this car, we made use of pre-established styling themes, such as the twin round headlamps. The public has demonstrated its acceptance of these themes as Mercedes elements, but--and even more important--it had accepted them as elements of a different Mercedes from the one that existed before.
"As for the future, we can confirm that the new concept of representativity has influenced the next-generation S-class, too. Even in that segment, marketing had to acknowledge that the requirements had changed, so we looked again at the S concept in this new light. Not with the intention of downgrading or cheapening the car, but with a view to a more understated, less imposing representativity."
In 1958, when Karl Wilfert, head of Daimler-Benz passenger-car design and research, hired Bruno Sacco as a designer, the passenger-car design department had many engineers but only one designer. Today, Bruno Sacco is director of design at Mercedes-Benz, and the department he manages has a large contingent of talented designers.
Sacco has done much to further the Mercedes-Benz philosophy of design, both through his department's successful production designs and, as an ambassador to the world, through interviews and speeches. He has, in a very real sense, helped to rationalize Mercedes-Benz design, codifying the underlying precepts that dictate the shape of the modem Mercedes-Benz passenger car.
Sacco refers to car design as prognosis. From the time design work on a new Mercedes-Benz model is completed to the time the last vehicles of that model are sold can be as long as 15 or 20 years--a long period for a design to remain fresh and interesting. But this challenge must be met--for the sake of Mercedes-Benz owners who retain their cars for long periods, and to fully complement Mercedes-Benz engineering and manufacture, which stress durability. It is a task to which Bruno Sacco has proved equal.
[Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.]

Laurival
Cadastro desatualizado pendente regularização

Número de mensagens : 4496
Data de inscrição : 21/10/2007
Interesses : Mercedes Benz
Sexo : Masculino País : Brasil
Estado : São Paulo
Advertências : Sem restrição

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

O italiano dos desenhos atemporais

Mensagem por Classe A em Ter 3 Nov 2009 - 19:59




[Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver esta imagem.]
Bruno Sacco comandou por um quarto de século o Estilo da Mercedes-Benz, onde criou carros que parecem não envelhecer

[Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver esta imagem.]
"Um Mercedes-Benz deve sempre parecer um Mercedes-Benz." A frase, que sintetiza uma das normas da empresa alemã quando se trata do desenho de seus automóveis, é do responsável pelas linhas de grande parte deles: o italiano Bruno Sacco, projetista que se manteve no comando do departamento de Estilo da Daimler-Benz entre 1975 e 1999.

Sacco nasceu em 12 de novembro de 1933 em Udine, no nordeste da Itália. Após se formar em Engenharia Mecânica na Universidade Politécnica de Turim, fez alguns trabalhos para os estúdios de estilo e construtores de carrocerias Ghia e [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.]. Mudou-se então para a Alemanha e em 1958, aos 24 anos, era contratado como projetista pela Daimler. Não pretendia ficar na empresa por muito tempo, mas o casamento com a berlinense Annemarie lbe e o nascimento da filha Marina o fizeram rever os planos. Entre os primeiros projetos em que atuou estão o conversível [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] da série R113 com o característico teto "Pagode", lançado em 1963, e o enorme e suntuoso modelo [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.], que chegou ao mercado um ano mais tarde.

Bruno trabalhou sob a supervisão de Karl Wilfert, Friedrich Geiger e Béla Barényi e ganhou posições na área de Estilo da empresa. Em 1970 tornava-se chefe do departamento de Desenho de Carrocerias e Projetos Dimensionais, área em que trabalhou nos projetos experimentais de segurança ou ESF (Experimental Safety Vehicles). Cinco anos depois assumia a chefia do departamento de Estilo em substituição a Geiger. Daquele ano em diante, foi ele o responsável pelo desenho de todo automóvel, caminhão e ônibus lançado com o emblema da estrela de três pontas. E também dos que nunca chegaram às concessionárias, mas brilharam em salões e fizeram os entusiastas mundo afora sonhar: os carros-conceito.

Saiu de sua prancheta, ainda antes de assumir o comando de Estilo, parte da série de superesportivos conceituais C-111. Eram carros de perfil baixo e linhas ousadas, com portas que se abriam para cima (as clássicas "asas de gaivota" imortalizadas pelo [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] de 1954), elementos vazados nas colunas traseiras e carroceria de plástico reforçado com fibra-de-vidro. O primeiro C-111 usava motor [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] de três rotores em 1969; o segundo, um de quatro rotores no ano seguinte; e o terceiro, um turbodiesel de cinco cilindros em 1978, mais tarde substituído por um V8 a gasolina de 4,8 litros e 500 cv. O último deles esbanjava eficiência aerodinâmica com seu [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] 0,191.

Sacco admitiu que levou alguns anos para compreender por inteiro a cultura de desenho da Mercedes, que não tinha "leis escritas", em suas palavras. A empresa valorizava o que ele definia como "homogeneidade horizontal" e "afinidade vertical". A primeira indica a similaridade de traços que deve existir entre os vários modelos contemporâneos da marca, para que todos sejam reconhecidos como pertencentes a uma "família", antes mesmo que se vejam seus emblemas e logotipos. Afinidade vertical refere-se a manter elementos em comum de uma geração para a subsequente, sem inovar de forma drástica, com o intuito de não dar ao modelo substituído uma imagem superada.

Uma medida importante na Mercedes, que por décadas se destacou pela longevidade de cada geração de suas linhas. Considerando que em tempos passados o ciclo de vida de um modelo da marca era de oito anos, e que a vida útil de um Mercedes estava na faixa de 20 anos, suas formas deveriam ser definidas de modo a manter a elegância e o apelo estético por três décadas.

[Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver esta imagem.]
Ele relembrava tais normas de trabalho no Salão de Turim de 1998: "Cada projeto deve ser visto sob uma perspectiva de longo prazo em que, além de permanecer coerente com nossa estratégia de estilo em seu desenvolvimento, descreva ao características de desenho dos carros Mercedes". Contudo, ele admitia que essa diretriz permitia algumas concessões, pois "alguém só reconhece uma tecnologia inovadora quando ela é associada a um desenho igualmente inovador". Entre os toques ousados introduzidos por ele estão as molduras laterais plásticas do [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] de 1979, as lanternas traseiras em forma de pirâmide do Classe C de 1993 e os quatro faróis ovalados do Classe E de 1995 — não por acaso, soluções que apareceram em carros de outras marcas algum tempo depois.

Bruno contestava a teoria do arquiteto norte-americano Louis Sullivan de que "a forma segue a função", por entender que estilo e técnica devem sempre caminhar juntos. Certa vez disse: "Para nós, não há primazia da tecnologia sobre o estilo ou do estilo sobre a tecnologia. A estética de um produto nunca pode pretender maquiar uma tecnologia de baixa qualidade".

Entre os automóveis de produção, Sacco assinou três gerações do Classe S, o topo de linha da marca — as séries designadas como W126 em 1979, W140 em 1991 e W220 em 1998. Enquanto a primeira conservava as linhas-mestras da Mercedes e a última era elegante em suas linhas leves e modernas, ele admite que a W140 não saiu como gostaria, por ser cerca de 10 centímetros mais alta que o ideal. Na linha intermediária Classe E, são suas as gerações [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] de 1984 e W210 de 1995, esta com a substituição dos tradicionais faróis retangulares pelas quatro unidades ovaladas, mudança experimentava em um cupê conceitual de 1993 e que causou controvérsia entre os fãs.

Também de Bruno foram os Mercedes de porte médio: o [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] revelado em 1982 e seu sucessor, o Classe C de 1993. Ele considera o 190 seu desenho predileto, tanto por sua importância para a marca quanto por ter inovado com a tampa do porta-malas curta e elevada, estilo que fez escola rapidamente entre os fabricantes. Certa vez definiu esse carro como "o perfeito exemplo, ao lado do Classe S, de como combinar inovação e tradição". E acrescentou que "foi o primeiro passo para a divisão da marca em diferentes segmentos", tendência que ganharia espaço nos anos 90 com modelos tão variados quanto o compacto Classe A e o utilitário esporte Classe M. Em 1993 ele se tornava membro do conselho de administração da empresa.

Naturalmente, não só de sedãs decorreu sua carreira. Ele desenhou os conversíveis SL de 1989 e SLK de 1997, o utilitário M do mesmo ano e o cupê CLK de 1996. Seu último projeto para a Mercedes foi o cupê [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] de 1999, com as interessantes colunas traseiras mais largas na parte superior que no ponto de encontro aos para-lamas. Em março daquele ano, após 41 anos de serviços à empresa, ele se aposentava e deixava o departamento para Peter Pfeiffer. Hoje trabalha com desenho industrial.

Sacco recebeu diversos prêmios e distinções, como o de membro honorário da Academia Mexicana de Desenho em 1985, o título Grande Oficial da Ordem ao Mérito na Itália em 1991, o prêmio Cover - Auto & Design em Turim em 1993, o prêmio Apulia em 1994, o de Melhor Projetista pela revista inglesa Car em 1996, os prêmios Lifetime Design Achievement em Detroit e Raymond Loewy Designer Award em 1997 e um doutorado honorário da Universidade de Udine em 2002. Quatro anos depois foi incluído no Automotive Hall of Fame, em Dearborn, Estados Unidos, e em 2007 no European Automotive Hall of Fame, em Genebra, Suíça — ele é uma entre poucas pessoas a ter recebido ambas as distinções.

Em 2006, em entrevista à revista norte-americana Automobile Magazine, Sacco falou sobre desenhos da Mercedes e de outras marcas. Em sua opinião, a Cadillac vinha fazendo bons trabalhos como modelos como o roadster de linhas angulosas XLR, derivado do carro-conceito Evoq. "É bom ver fabricantes desenvolvendo uma nova linguagem de estilo, mas é importante ser cauteloso sobre que modelos a empresa escolhe para adotar um desenho ousado", ponderava. Os clássicos esportivos [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] e Ferrari 275 GTB, ambos dos anos 60, tinham os estilos mais apreciados por ele fora da linha Mercedes; nesta, o predileto era mesmo o 300 SL da década de 1950.

Entre os desenhos que não o agradavam estavam os de alguns utilitários coreanos — sem citar nomes — e os da BMW na época, criados pelo polêmico norte-americano Chris Bangle, que segundo Bruno "parecem ter perdido o foco definido em seu tema de estilo". Sobre formas nostálgicas, Sacco pensava que "são populares e ajudam a vender carros, mas oferecem poucas perspectivas em desenho". Então proprietário de um cupê Mercedes 560 SEC, derivado do Classe S dos anos 80, o projetista definia seu passeio ideal para um fim-de-semana: dirigir um [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.] até Paris.

Fonte: [Você precisa estar registrado e conectado para ver este link.]

Classe A
Usuário Bronze
Usuário Bronze

Número de mensagens : 66
Data de inscrição : 30/08/2008
Sexo : Masculino País : Brasil
Advertências : Sem restrição

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Re: Bruno Sacco, o pai do carrinho

Mensagem por Sidão em Ter 3 Nov 2009 - 22:12



Bruno Sacco faz muita falta nesses tempos de design globalizado onde tudo tem cara de coreano.
Dá saudade dos tempos em que Mercedes tinha realmente cara de Mercedes.
avatar
Sidão
Usuário Prata
Usuário Prata

Número de mensagens : 285
Data de inscrição : 24/04/2009
Interesses : Mercedes Benz - anos 80 e 90
Sexo : Masculino País : Brasil
Estado : Distrito Federal
Advertências : Sem restrição

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Re: Bruno Sacco, o pai do carrinho

Mensagem por ZIG MASTER em Qua 4 Nov 2009 - 15:50



Na minha opinião, o legendário Bruno Sacco é um dos responsáveis pela manutenção de tradicionalidade de estilo das Mercedes, que atualmente está se perdendo.
avatar
ZIG MASTER
Usuário Platina
Usuário Platina

Número de mensagens : 4850
Data de inscrição : 19/03/2008
Interesses : Mercedes Benz
Sexo : Masculino País : Brasil
Estado : São Paulo
Advertências : Sem restrição

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Re: Bruno Sacco, o pai do carrinho

Mensagem por Krycek em Qua 4 Nov 2009 - 16:47



Poxa terminar a carreira com W220 e C215 é melhor coroacao! king

Krycek
Moderador
Moderador

Número de mensagens : 8302
Data de inscrição : 13/07/2008
Interesses : .
Sexo : Masculino País : Brasil
Estado : Rio de Janeiro
Advertências : Sem restrição

Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Re: Bruno Sacco, o pai do carrinho

Mensagem por Conteúdo patrocinado




Conteúdo patrocinado


Voltar ao Topo Ir em baixo

Ver o tópico anterior Ver o tópico seguinte Voltar ao Topo


 
Permissão deste fórum:
Você não pode responder aos tópicos neste fórum